Home Monitoring for Seniors

When we talk about home monitoring systems for senior adults, the most common image is that of the commercials with a woman falling and unable to reach her telephone. The ad goes on to taut its wearable technology as the latest development in senior care. However, today’s devices are much more discreet and tech-savvy. Gone are large, clunky wearable devices of the past. Today’s seniors rely on app-based security programs and sleek, modern cameras and motion sensors. We’ve compiled a list of the best home monitoring services and products.

Safety from home invasions and natural disasters are significant concerns for everyone but are especially concerning for aging seniors living alone. New smartphone-enabled security systems like Nest and Abode are popular with customers of all ages for their easy installation and customizable features. Both home security systems boast minimalist systems with few components to manage and troubleshoot. These devices monitor doors, windows, and motion, and trigger an alarm that can notify authorities and caregivers if there is a problem. Both systems use app-based technology to monitor regular activity and send notifications to seniors and caregivers. Notifications regarding smoke alarms, flood warnings, and temperature sensors are shared with caregivers, who can check-in via the smartphone app to make sure things like doors and windows are locked, or if an alarm was triggered by mistake.

The most popular feature of these systems is their integrations with smart devices like Amazon Alexa, or Google Assistant, which allow for voice commands and programmable automation features. Not only can both smart speakers be connected to home safety devices for more comfortable use, but they have also shown to be highly beneficial in assisting seniors living alone. These devices work as a smart home hub that connects to lights, power switches, and other gadgets allowing seniors to control their homes with voice. These assistive devices can also be programmed to call loved ones and set reminders for important tasks, like changing the batteries in a smoke detector, or reminding one to turn the oven off. Voice-activated technology has shown to eliminate the learning curve with technology that can be a barrier for seniors.

One device that deploys similar technology to Alexa and Google Assistant, but with aging seniors as their primary focus is TruSense. This network of home-connected devices integrates with other smart home devices. It includes a motion sensor, contact sensor, and smart outlets that work together to provide up-to-date data for caregivers. TruSense also provides caregivers with probable fall alerts and notifications for when a loved one leaves home.

A recognizable name that has recently come up in senior care is Best Buy for its newly launched Assured Living service. The goal of Assured Living is to give adult children and caregivers peace of mind when living apart from aging parents, by using non-invasive sensors and notifications for activities like movement and sleep patterns. The service also provides aging seniors with the latest in smart home technology, such as voice commands for lights and thermostat controls. Aging parents and caregivers can track the data from the sensors via an online portal or mobile app, or can sign up for notifications via text or email. These sensors learn the habits and routines of seniors over time to notify loved ones when common patterns are disrupted. In addition to safety and emergencies, the sensors can also show whether a loved one has opened a medicine cabinet or refrigerator. The device can also monitor sleep quality and activity levels.

When it comes to independence and home safety, today’s seniors have several high tech and easy to operate services and devices to choose from, regardless of their personal needs.

At Northridge Village, we provide emergency pendant systems that allow residents to click a button for help, and all exterior doors are monitored and alarmed. If you have questions about our building security, please give us a call!

How to Start the Conversation

A helpful guide for navigating a tricky conversation around senior living

There are a handful of conversations we have at different phases of life that carry a stigma. Talking to an aged parent(s) about moving to a nursing home is definitely on that list. The fear of this conversation is understandable and may be keeping you from striking it up. But it is in everyone’s best interest to have the conversation, and have it with care. Here’s a guide of things to consider that may make this conversation much easier to approach.

 

Start the conversation early

Start it too early. Start it when it feels like it’s relevance is way down the line. This offers an opportunity to have the seed planted long before there is any threat of eventuality raising the emotion of the conversation. Find out what is important to them as a couple, as individuals, and for their family. This way, your parent(s) has the chance to freely share their wishes and you can be armed with that information when the right time comes.

Maybe they already have a specific location in mind! Inquire about waiting lists long before you need them so you’re not in the position of choosing a place based on availability when crisis strikes.

 

Assess the right time

At some point, the conversation about moving to assisted living becomes a necessity. This looks different for every family, but hopefully you’re able to make this decision a priority before there is a disaster at home.

One great way to identify the right time is to volunteer to come around the house for a project, something extensive like landscaping or cleaning the house, so you can see their range of motion and the state of the household. It will give you an idea of how your parents are faring with the upkeep of their residence while also laying a foundation of good will and trust that could be the opening for a future conversation.

 

Do your research

Having information prepared always makes a hard conversation less challenging. Hopefully you know your parents’ wishes, but even if you weren’t able to start the conversation early, you know your parents.

Do they want to be closer to family? Do they care about having access to a kitchen to make family favorites? Do they want to live in assisted or independent living? What is the future of their illness? Do they have a pet or furniture they want to bring along?

These are concerns they will raise when the conversation comes, so knowing what their options are that address these needs can be a real lifesaver when presenting the option of aged care.

 

Consider your language

Often times, family dynamics can be the hardest part of a conversation like this. Even your own assumption that this conversation will be hard can make the conversation hard. Enter into the conversation in a positive and helpful way. Ask questions about how your parent is doing. Present your concerns directly, but also offer a balanced amount of optimism about the benefits of the communities they might consider. Use your knowledge of what matters to them to frame these benefits.

This conversation could bring up a lot of feelings for your parent. Be sure to acknowledge whatever your parent communicates to you, whether positive or negative. People want to be heard, and not only will affirming their concerns let them know you understand them but it will also give you insight into what may be holding them back so you can help them overcome their objections.

And, perhaps most importantly, take it slow. You don’t have to make a decision in a day. This is a huge life change for you parent. Let it simmer for a bit to give them time to adjust.

 

Personalize it

Mention how much your friend’s mom loves the social aspect of her new home, or how you ran into the son of your parent’s old colleague who says his dad couldn’t be more thrilled about being off the hook for yard work.

If they don’t buy the anecdotes, take your parent to check out places out together! Sometimes seeing a senior community in person can dispel an unsavory preconception. Especially if you can take them somewhere where they already have friends! Seeing the a place up close can help your parents actually envision themselves there.

 

It’s their decision

As long as it is safely possible, this needs to be their decision and they need to know that you know that. If they’re not ready right away, offer other solutions that bridge the gap and buy them the time they need to adjust on their own. Gift them a cleaning service, update some safety features of their home, or organize home care.

Not forcing the issue and letting your parent decide will make you a safe sounding board for your parent as they processes this idea, but also will make their adjustment when they finally decide to move much smoother and happier.

You may be surprised to find out your parent is more amenable than you imagined, and giving them their own space to decide what their life will look like will make them feel even better about their decision to move forward into this next phase.

 

Bring in help

If it is getting dangerous at home and you aren’t making any headway, consider bringing in a friend, spiritual leader, or another trusted person to help have the conversation. The truth is, no matter how well intentioned, the adult children of aging parents aren’t always the best person for this conversation. Your road block isn’t the end of the road, often a third party can pave the way when you thought the conversation was going nowhere. Don’t take this personally, let the help you’ve enlisted move the conversation forward and you can focus on being a support system and maintaining your relationship with your family.

 

The Best Podcasts for Seniors

While they have been around for several years, podcasts have recently become an overwhelmingly popular form of entertainment and information. According to The Podcast Consumer 2018 from Edison Research, 34% of 18- to 34-year-olds, and 36% of 35- to 54-year-olds are monthly listeners. Seniors 55-plus make up 19% of current listeners. A podcast is an online show, structured similarly to radio shows seniors might have grown up enjoying. Like radio, they are entirely audio – no video. They are available on the internet to download for free onto a smartphone or a computer using your web browser. They vary in length, with most running between 30 minutes and one hour. Podcasts cover a wide variety of topics; there is a show dedicated to almost any interest and demographic. Below are a few we recommend for seniors.

 

Freakonomics

Each week, Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books, speaks with Nobel laureates, entrepreneurs, intellectuals, and others about socioeconomic issues for a general audience. With over 8 million downloads per month, it is one of the most popular podcasts on Apple Podcast. Topics range from tipping customs to Chinese folklore, to exercise, and in-home DNA testing kits. This podcast, like many others, doesn’t have a chronological order, so feel free to skip around, or pick a topic that interests you and enjoy.

 

This American Life

This American Life is a weekly public radio show hosted by Ira Glass. Heard by 2.2 million people, with another 2.5 million people downloading it weekly. The show primarily focuses on journalistic nonfiction and essays, with each episode following a theme. Through interviews and first-person narratives, the diverse topics cover a broad span of moods and tone. The wide variety of these stories will entertain seniors, and inspire them to share them with others, as many reviewers of the podcast have done. In addition to sharing stories, the show also covers current events and how those events affect real people.

 

Criminal

Criminal is a podcast about true crime and the people behind the cases. Every story is real. The interviewees are directly involved with the crime in some way or another. Stories of people on both sides of the law. Stories of people caught in the middle and the ones who solve the cases. What’s it like to make counterfeit money? Have you ever had your identity stolen? Who cleans up crime scenes? Each episode is a standalone story, so feel free to skip around and listen to the titles that catch your eye.

 

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Produced by the team at HowStuffWorks, this podcast is ideal for seniors with a keen interest in history. Skipping over well-known events of the past, Stuff You Learned in History class takes a deep dive into the stories left out of the history books. Highlighting social and cultural happenings and highlighting forgotten historical figures around the world, the podcast provides insight into moments of history long forgotten. Because the podcast covers so many historical topics, you can listen by theme or period of time.

 

The Alton Browncast

Food Network’s Alton Brown chats with a wide array of food industry professionals. Featuring chefs and bartenders, authors, scientists, and everyone in-between, Alton Brown talks about food and how we eat throughout the podcast. It’s perfect for the senior interested in cooking and dining.

 

Better Health While Aging

Hosted by practicing geriatrics specialist, Leslie Kernisan, MD MPH, this is a podcast for older adults and family caregivers alike. Dr. Kernisan and her guests discuss common health problems that affect seniors, and what works for improving health and wellness while aging. She and her guests also address common concerns and dilemmas that come with caring for aging parents. Medication safety, memory and cognitive health, and managing cardiovascular risks are just a few of the topics covered in this highly informational podcast.

 

You Must Remember This

You Must Remember This is a critically acclaimed podcast exploring the forgotten histories of Hollywood’s first century. Proclaimed as the best podcast of 2018 by Entertainment Weekly, the show is written and narrated by former film critic Karina Longworth; it is the ideal show for any senior interested in the golden age of cinema. A heavily-researched work of creative nonfiction, Karina sorts out what happened behind the scenes of the films, stars, and scandals of the 20th century.

 

If any of these shows appeal to you or someone you might know, or you want to go searching on your own, there are several options for accessing podcasts. If you have a smartphone, there are apps to help you listen and keep you updated on shows you enjoy. If you have an iPhone, there is a podcast app pre-installed. You can also download other apps for listening, like Stitcher. The Google Play Music and Spotify apps are great options for those who want to transition between music and shows.

 

One last great feature of podcasts is that they can be stopped and started and returned to at a later time. This feature makes them ideal for seniors who enjoy a busy lifestyle or want to enjoy their favorite shows with family and friends.

The Perks of Getting Older – The Best Things about the Retirement Age of Life

The Benefits of Aging in Place

northridge village rehab

The current and upcoming generations of retirees seek options to enhance their lifestyle choices. While many would prefer to retire in a home where they have lived for decades, living active and independent lives. New options in retirement planning allow seniors to age in place within a retirement community. These communities feature the independence of home but with the reassurance of additional assistance through each phase of aging. Nearly two in 10 Americans aged 70 and older state that they either cannot, or find it difficult, to live independently and accomplish daily tasks without help.

 

Activities for Everyone

Modern retirement communities can help older adults help themselves. Senior living communities enable their residents to experience a wide range of lifestyle choices. Research has found that active and healthy seniors in assisted living communities went outside more than those living in their own homes and engaged more with their peers. Many who move into a retirement community realize that they are living more independently. With a wide range of dining options and social engagement programs, seniors discover that independence means more than just living outside of a retirement community.

These living communities have common areas to encourage socialization and plan activities and outings for residents. Others who have no desire to socialize, enjoy private living in a home setting where they can have guests at their leisure.

 

No More Chores

Aside from keeping up with social engagements, a retirement community often takes the burden out of dangerous chores, or just those that become more difficult as we age. While most active seniors are capable of small chores, such as sweeping or changing a light bulb, a retirement community provides a full staff for larger tasks, such as mowing the lawn, clearing gutters, or appliance maintenance. Another benefit of having an entire team within a retirement community is that as a seniors’ ability to accomplish chores deteriorates, there is always someone on hand to provide all levels of assistance, without the senior leaving their home within the community.

While staying in a home where one has lived for thirty or forty years might be comfortable, as we age, it might not be as safe as it once was. Stairs could become more complicated, narrow hallways cannot accommodate walkers, tile floors are slippery, and shelves might be harder to reach. Making home renovations to accommodate our abilities as we age can become costly and overwhelming. When living in a retirement community, these features are built into every home and public area. They include ramps for exterior stairs, wider doorways to accommodate walkers or wheelchairs, indoor threshold ramps, slip-proof floors, and safety rails. Residents may also choose to install a walk-in shower or bathtub.

 

How Can We Help?

Northridge Village offers a high level of service and support for active seniors, those who need a little more assistance, and residents who require a higher level of long-term care. Independent living residents can enjoy a productive and engaging social life while moving at one’s own pace and with full maintenance staff, none of the concerns of traditional homeownership. Our pet-friendly residences feature expansive, light-filled floor plans with full kitchens, in-unit laundry, and complimentary outdoor parking. When residents move into a phase of life that requires more assistance, we offer a higher level of support for those daily activities. We can assist with everything from dressing and bathing to around-the-clock skilled nursing care.

The Levels of Care You Need to Know

By the time you finish this sentence, three older Americans have fallen. And those falls are dangerous. According to the CDC, an adult 65 years or older falls each second, and that is the number one cause of injuries and death from injury among older Americans. The financial impact of those falls is shocking — $67.7 billion by 2020. CDC Director Tom Frieden said, “Older adult falls are increasing and, sadly, often herald the end of independence.”

Whether your loved one lives independently and is in good health or your loved one is showing signs of slowing down, you need to know what levels of care are available for them. Eventually, they will need extra help. Maybe not tomorrow. Or next week. But maybe in a few years, your mom or dad will start to forget basic things like the day of the week or who the United States’ president is. This is why you need to know what kind of assistance is available.

There are generally four levels of care: independent living, assisted living, short-term rehab, long-term care. Because your loved one’s needs will eventually change, you need to know the answers to questions like “What’s included in assisted living?” and “What does the day of an independent living resident look like?” With this knowledge, you’ll be prepared to help them make the best decisions for their future.

Keep reading to meet June (an independent living resident), John (an assisted living resident), Linda (a short-term rehab resident), and Roger (a long-term care resident).

Independent Living

A Day in the Life — June Wessell, 77 years old

June and her dog, Lady, live in a 1-bedroom apartment inside a senior living community, and her days begin at 7 a.m. After sipping coffee on her small patio, June takes her dog on a walk. During the spring, they walk outside. But if snow is on the ground, they stay indoors. As she passes her neighbors, she often stops to chat about yesterday’s events and the day’s activities. When the two-mile walk is over, June and Lady take a quick break in their apartment before the chapel Bible study at 10 a.m.

At lunch, June sits in her usual seat with her four closest community friends. They reminisce about the good ole days —5¢ Coke drinks and drive-in movies.

At 2 p.m., June listens to a local school’s choir in her community’s event room. Later that afternoon, her two grandchildren visit, and they play their favorite board game Monopoly.

After dinner, June and Lady enjoy reruns of The Andy Griffith Show and I Love Lucy before starting the bedtime routine at 8:30 p.m.

The Basics

As you can see from June’s story, independent living residents don’t need any assistance with daily activities. They’re able to exercise, cook, and do anything they want to do all on their own. Most independent living communities offer many activities and encourage their residents to maintain an active lifestyle. With minimal housekeeping and no internal or external maintenance responsibilities, independent living residents can maximize their retirement by not being bogged down with the inconvenient tasks of homeownership.

Since these private living spaces are for older adults who don’t require assistance, you’ll find amenities like a washer and dryer, patio, and a full-service kitchen just like you would find in a small apartment.

Also, independent living residents are typically offered:

  • Restaurant-style lunch & continental breakfast
  • Emergency response pendant system
  • Transportation to scheduled activity outings
  • All-inclusive utilities (except phone)
  • Washer and dryer
  • Individually-controlled central heating and cooling system
  • Weekly housekeeping
  • Storage unit
  • Complimentary outdoor parking (underground parking is available for an additional fee)
  • Full kitchen with modern appliances
  • Daily activities

A Word from a Team Member

Chelsea Freie, the marketing director at Terrace Glen Village, says, “Our independent living residents are full of energy and always involved in community events. Many of them do some of our best marketing work by telling their friends about us because they love living here. Occasionally they’ll need assistance when their television stops working or a light bulb that needs replacing is out of reach. But, for the most part, they live their own lives and have a lot of activities outside of this community.”

To learn about independent living options, call (515) 232-1000 or click here.

Assisted Living

A Day in the Life — John Greene, 89

In his 553 sq. ft., 1-bedroom apartment, John begins each day by watching the morning news. Sometimes he forgets where he last placed the remote so when a nurse checks in on him every morning, they help John find it. He eats breakfast in the assisted living dining room and usually eats cheerios, yogurt, or scrambled eggs.

John loves the morning activities so you can typically find him in the activity room making a new knickknack or craft. At lunchtime, a certified medication aide helps John take his diabetes medicines with the appropriate amount of liquids and food. In the afternoon, John rides to his doctor’s apartment via the community bus where he and the bus driver usually have the same conversation each trip.

Throughout the day, John keeps his emergency response pendant system around his neck in case he needs immediate help because he does struggle with dementia. While he’s out of his apartment, community team members go into his apartment and wash his clothes, replace the linens, and clean and dust. John needs assistance bathing and dressing so a nurse always helps him take care of those needs.

The Basics

Assisted living residents need some help with daily activities like bathing, dressing, and taking the right medications at the right times. Although these residents are given more assistance than independent living residents, they’re still encouraged to be as independent as possible.

Most communities offer the following amenities for assisted living residents:

  • Spacious 1- or 2-bedroom apartments
  • Three restaurant-style meals
  • Emergency response pendant system
  • Wellness checks and a service plan supervised by a registered nurse
  • Kitchenette with a refrigerator and a microwave
  • Transportation to scheduled activity outings and appointments
  • All-inclusive utilities ( (except phone)
  • Weekly housekeeping, laundry, and linen services
  • Individually-controlled central heating and cooling system
  • Complimentary outdoor parking (underground parking is available for an additional fee)
  • Daily activities

A Word from a Team Member

Jill Lamb, the marketing director at Colonial Village, says, “Some of our most active residents live in the assisted living part of our campus. Just because they need help with a few tasks doesn’t mean they aren’t active and engaged. If you’re thinking about moving your loved one into an assisted living community, don’t think you would be limiting their independence. In an assisted living community, they have more independence with a team member’s help, and they can enjoy life more.”

To learn about assisted living options, call (515) 232-1000 or click here.

Short-Term Rehab

A Day in the Life — Linda Blackburn, 58

Linda lives in a three-story house with her husband of 31 years, but she fell and broke her leg while walking down the front porch steps on an icy day. So after successful surgery, Linda was transferred to a rehabilitation facility in hopes to return home within a few weeks. At this facility, Linda works through physical therapy each day with a licensed physical therapist. She receives three daily meals and is visited by the community medical doctor each week.

Since this facility is Medicare-approved and certified, Linda will only pay for her stay after the 20th day (as long as she is making progress). After five weeks of slow and steady improvement, Linda returned home.

The Basics

While the above example is very specific, short-term rehabilitation offers other kinds of therapy like occupational and speech therapy. Each therapist works with the patient on their specific needs and goals because everyone’s rehab situation is different.

Most communities offer the following amenities for short-term rehab residents:

  • Private, semi-private, enhanced semi-private rooms
  • Three restaurant-style meals
  • Daily activities
  • Physical, occupational, and speech therapy
  • Individually tailored goals

A Word from a Team Member

Judy Baxter, the marketing director at Westchester Village of Lenexa, says, “I’m so thankful our community offers short-term rehabilitation because I am inspired by those who work hard in their therapy to eventually return home. The nice thing about a continuing care retirement community where short-term rehab is included is that an independent living resident who might fall and break a bone can receive rehab right down the hall — they don’t have to worry about moving to a new community because it’s all under one roof.”

To learn about short-term rehab options, call (515) 232-1000 or click here.

Long-Term Care

A Day in the Life — Roger Hutchins, 84

Roger’s stroke made daily tasks like showering, trips to the restroom, eating, and changing clothes especially difficult. His stroke also worsened his Alzheimer’s symptoms. So Roger’s family moved him to a long-term care facility where the staff could give him 24-hour skilled nursing care. Each day, Roger uses their help to eat, bathe, and change clothes.

His favorite part of the day is the afternoon walk in the courtyard. A nurse will help Roger transfer to a wheelchair, and Roger is pushed through the courtyard for about 20 minutes. The facility does a great job scheduling events for their long-term care residents, and Roger enjoys those events every day before dinner. He especially loves listening to the local elementary school choir sing holiday songs each December.

The Basics

Long-term care is for those who are unable to perform daily activities on their own like eating, bathing, dressing, etc. Ultimately, the purpose of long-term care is to help the resident maintain their lifestyle as they age. Medicare usually does not cover long-term care costs.

Most communities offer the following amenities for long-term care residents:

  • Private, semi-private, enhanced semi-private rooms
  • Three restaurant-style meals
  • Daily activities
  • Electronic medical charting
  • Enclosed courtyard

A Word from a Team Member

Summer English, the marketing director at Northridge Village, says, “Even though our long-term care residents need a lot of assistance in their daily lives, they still share so much joy. They teach me each day how to enjoy life to the fullest.”

To learn about long-term care options, call (515) 232-1000 or click here.

5 Things To Do For A Happy Thanksgiving with Dementia

Thanksgiving is a time for families to gather and share a meal, to reminisce about old memories and make new ones. However, when a loved one is diagnosed with dementia, such as Alzheimer’s, some past family traditions might cause anxiety and confusion for a loved one, not to mention the additional stress put on a caregiver. Here are some tips to make your holiday celebrations more enjoyable for your loved one, as well as the entire family.

1. Arrange A Quiet Space

Your loved one with dementia can become easily confused and anxious with a crowded space and relatives that may now be unfamiliar to them. Make sure they have a quiet space away from the holiday commotion if they become overwhelmed or exhausted with the day’s activities. If possible, try to host your holiday in a familiar home and reduce travel. Ask that family members come to the home of your loved one or their caregivers. If your loved one resides in a long-term care facility, consider bringing a bit of Thanksgiving to them, instead of checking them out to travel to a relative’s home that they may not be entirely familiar with.

2. Involve Friends & Family

You might have guests in the home who are not aware of the current situation with a family member with Alzheimer’s. It’s important to make everyone who will be joining you for the day aware of your loved one’s condition and status, especially if it is a new diagnosis or their condition has progressed greatly since the last time everyone was together. The added stress of planning Thanksgiving festivities can take a toll on a caregiver. Take advantage of the additional family members in the home for the holiday. Delegate tasks, like cooking or setting up for the meal to other family members to lighten your workload. Or come up with activities for family members to participate in with your loved one with dementia, so the sole responsibility of looking after them doesn’t fall entirely on the shoulders of one person for the day.

3. Celebrate Earlier in the Day

As the day transitions from afternoon to evening, it can have negative effects on those living with dementia. This is known as Sundown syndrome, which can manifest itself in a variety of behaviors, like anger or confusion. One way to reduce its effect on your day is to schedule your primary Thanksgiving meal earlier in the day. If you’ve always celebrated at dinner time, consider moving your holiday meal to lunch or brunch. Not only will this reduce added stress for your loved one, it might even create a new holiday meal tradition.

4. Find Ways to Engage Your Loved One with Dementia

Depending on their mental capacity and physical ability, find small tasks for them to focus on throughout the day. There is much to be done when preparing a large family meal, and there should be some small task for everyone, including your loved one. Can they stir the potatoes? Set the table? Keeping them busy with a familiar task can help calm them down and distract from the unfamiliar aspects of the day. If the usual Thanksgiving preparation tasks aren’t possible for your loved one, establish new traditions that will make them comfortable or reduce their stress level. Have everyone share memories from past holidays, engaging your loved one about what they remember from growing up, or previous celebrations. Look at old photo albums and ask them questions about the past. It’s important to remember to be an active and engaged listener in these situations. Do not interrupt or correct them if they don’t remember the exact version of past events or repeat themselves.

5. Forget the Pressure of the Perfect Holiday

Maybe Thanksgiving this year doesn’t look like it always has, but that’s okay. Your family might not look like it always has either. Instead of focusing on what is different about this year, or how you might be moving away from past traditions, focus on the new traditions you can create.

Traditions and delicious food aside, what Thanksgiving truly comes down to is gratitude and spending time with family and friends, which can be accomplished a variety of ways. It’s important for family to celebrate and not focus on what might have been lost, but instead to celebrate what remains, and remain optimistic about what is to come. If you or someone you know finds themselves struggling with the holiday and caring for a loved one, the Alzheimer’s Association has a helpline that is staffed by clinicians all day, every day (yes, even on Thanksgiving) who can offer support. The number is 800-272-3900.

5 Warning Signs of Dementia You Need To Know

Northridge Village Announces Reopening Plan

Northridge Village Announces Reopening Plan

Northridge Village is working with state and local health officials to implement a phased approach toward safely reopening our facility for visitation that has been restricted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. “We understand that the past few months have been challenging due to the emergence of the COVID-19 virus and…
Home Monitoring for Seniors

Home Monitoring for Seniors

When we talk about home monitoring systems for senior adults, the most common image is that of the commercials with a woman falling and unable to reach her telephone. The ad goes on to taut its wearable technology as the latest development in senior care. However, today’s devices are much…

How to Start the Conversation

A helpful guide for navigating a tricky conversation around senior living There are a handful of conversations we have at different phases of life that carry a stigma. Talking to an aged parent(s) about moving to a nursing home is definitely on that list. The fear of this conversation is…
Meet Ashley Sartin — Our New Assisted Living Director

Meet Ashley Sartin — Our New Assisted Living Director

Northridge Village announced that Ashley Sartin is the new Assisted Living Director, and Ashley is thrilled to be at Northridge Village. She was formerly the Director of Nursing at Windsor Manor Assisted Living, and she was a Flight Nurse for the Desert Air Ambulance. When asked about her career, Ashley…
The Best Podcasts for Seniors

The Best Podcasts for Seniors

While they have been around for several years, podcasts have recently become an overwhelmingly popular form of entertainment and information. According to The Podcast Consumer 2018 from Edison Research, 34% of 18- to 34-year-olds, and 36% of 35- to 54-year-olds are monthly listeners. Seniors 55-plus make up 19% of current…

Important Information Concerning the Coronavirus

To Our Residents and Family Members: We know many of you are concerned about the spread of COVID-19 (the new coronavirus) and how it may impact us here. Ensuring residents are cared for in a safe and healthy environment is our first priority. At this time, we don’t have any…
The Perks of Getting Older – The Best Things about the Retirement Age of Life

The Perks of Getting Older – The Best Things about the Retirement Age of Life

A Brighter Outlook Studies show that senior citizens are among the happiest groups of people, and they tend to be more satisfied than their middle-aged counterparts. A telephone survey conducted by Stony Brook University found that people over 50-years-old were happier overall, with anger steadily declining in their 20s through…
The Benefits of Aging in Place

The Benefits of Aging in Place

The current and upcoming generations of retirees seek options to enhance their lifestyle choices. While many would prefer to retire in a home where they have lived for decades, living active and independent lives. New options in retirement planning allow seniors to age in place within a retirement community. These…
coronavirus northridge village

Northridge Village Announces Reopening Plan

Northridge Village is working with state and local health officials to implement a phased approach toward safely reopening our facility for visitation that has been restricted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. “We understand that the past few months have been challenging due to the emergence of the COVID-19 virus and the additional safety precautions that
Read More

Home Monitoring for Seniors

When we talk about home monitoring systems for senior adults, the most common image is that of the commercials with a woman falling and unable to reach her telephone. The ad goes on to taut its wearable technology as the latest development in senior care. However, today’s devices are much more discreet and tech-savvy. Gone
Read More

How to Start the Conversation

A helpful guide for navigating a tricky conversation around senior living There are a handful of conversations we have at different phases of life that carry a stigma. Talking to an aged parent(s) about moving to a nursing home is definitely on that list. The fear of this conversation is understandable and may be keeping
Read More

Meet Ashley Sartin — Our New Assisted Living Director

Northridge Village announced that Ashley Sartin is the new Assisted Living Director, and Ashley is thrilled to be at Northridge Village. She was formerly the Director of Nursing at Windsor Manor Assisted Living, and she was a Flight Nurse for the Desert Air Ambulance. When asked about her career, Ashley said, “My passion for nursing
Read More

The Best Podcasts for Seniors

While they have been around for several years, podcasts have recently become an overwhelmingly popular form of entertainment and information. According to The Podcast Consumer 2018 from Edison Research, 34% of 18- to 34-year-olds, and 36% of 35- to 54-year-olds are monthly listeners. Seniors 55-plus make up 19% of current listeners. A podcast is an
Read More

Important Information Concerning the Coronavirus

To Our Residents and Family Members: We know many of you are concerned about the spread of COVID-19 (the new coronavirus) and how it may impact us here. Ensuring residents are cared for in a safe and healthy environment is our first priority. At this time, we don’t have any cases in our community. The
Read More

5 Warning Signs of Dementia You Need To Know

How to tell if your memory loss is normal or a sign of Alzheimer’s

The term “senior moment” was aptly coined because the truth is we get forgetful as we age. This is a completely normal part of being an aging human, and shouldn’t be an immediate cause for concern. Unless memory loss is extreme or persistent, it is not considered a sign of Alzheimer’s.

It’s important to remember that memory loss can be caused by numerous situations and diseases. Even if you aren’t concerned its dementia, it could be worth chatting with a doctor to see if your memory loss is a symptom of something treatable.

Common causes of memory loss in seniors include:

  • Aging – change of hormone levels, physical deterioration, decreased blood flow
  • Medication side effects
  • Stroke
  • Dehydration
  • Stress
  • Grief
  • Depression
  • Alcoholism
  • Nutritional deficiency

If you’ve ruled out the above but can’t shake the feeling your memory loss is more serious than simple aging, keep reading. We’ve compiled 5 of the most common signs of dementia. Hopefully, this list will put you at ease, but if the more severe examples sound like you or a loved one, it is a good idea to meet with a doctor for a proper diagnosis.

 

Potential Warning Signs of Dementia:

1) Memory loss that impedes function in daily life

Short term memory loss, misplacing objects, and struggling to complete everyday tasks can all be signs of dementia.

Aging seniors sometimes find themselves forgetting the name of a person they just met, losing their keys, or fumbling with their internet browser because they’ve forgotten how it works.

With normal forgetfulness, these memories will come back to you later once you’ve retraced your steps or jogged your memory with a sticky note.

There is cause for concern, however, if you are consistently finding yourself forgetting details about your life or how things work. People who have dementia find that they are dependent on other people or memory tools to function day-to-day.

2) Increase in poor decision-making

Poor decision-making certainly isn’t a trait uniquely attributed to those with dementia, it is a problem that can plague all ages.

This can be an indication of a more serious condition, however, when the poor decision-making is a personality change or if the poor decisions are extreme. Suddenly losing consistency with hygiene or making highly irresponsible financial decisions can be signs of dementia.

3) Difficulty with communication

This goes beyond the common feeling of trying to grasp an evasive word. If something feels like it’s on the tip of your tongue, it probably is.

Questions of dementia come into play when someone has trouble following a conversation. They lose track of where they are in the discussion, either by skipping important elements of the topic or repeating themselves without awareness. They can also have a hard time with vocabulary, both by forgetting common words or simply using incorrect words.

4) Confusion with time or place

Forgetting what day of the week it is or why you went into the kitchen are examples of a normal memory fault. These little memory hiccups usually resolve themselves when the answer comes back to you a few minutes later.

A sign of dementia is when you lose track of what year it is, don’t recognize the passing of seasons, or get confused by timelines. Experiencing the past as the present or displaying confusion if things aren’t happening immediately are common behaviors of a person with dementia.

5) Change of personality

There can be many causes for a change in personality, and many of them are common amongst seniors and have nothing to do with dementia. While not the most definitive sign of dementia, it is important to keep an eye on behavioral change when it happens alongside memory loss.

Because of the difficulty in holding a conversation, the challenge of remembering the rules of a game, or the frustration with not being able to remember how to navigate simple daily tasks, people with dementia can often withdraw from family, friends, and hobbies. Fear, anxiety, depression, paranoia, and confusion can also accompany dementia.

So, what do you do if you recognize some of the more indicative signs of dementia in your behavior or the behavior of someone you love? It is important not to delay in meeting with a doctor. Early detection is important in diagnosing Alzheimer’s. Bring someone along with you who can offer support, but who can also help you make sense of what is being discussed. Whether or not dementia is diagnosed, it is worth getting a definitive answer from a medical professional if you’re concerned.

Technology for Seniors

Technology is such a large part of life these days. We are spoiled for choice, and often the noise of too many options can be overwhelming. The tech space is producing some real benefits for people of all ages.

Seniors now have access to devices and apps that improve social connections and cognitive function, as well as keeping them safe and giving a hand with little things that can sometimes be a challenge as we age.

Take a look at the list below, which has curated some beneficial technology options for seniors. While this list isn’t exhaustive, it can get you started navigating the world of tech and discovering for yourself the many ways it can improve your daily life.

Smartphone / Tablet

The features of the smartphone and tablet go way beyond phone calls and emails. There are endless apps that can be downloaded, many of which are free. There are also settings on these devices that allow you to set your text to a larger setting, as well as a voice-to-text feature that types what you speak if your hands are unsteady with the keyboard.

  • Magnifying Glass with Light – hover it over text and read the larger words on your screen. Perfect for restaurant menus with tiny text.
  • Pill Reminder by Medisafe – reminds you to take medication and sends alerts to caregivers if a dosage has been missed.
  • Kindle – download your favorite books on the screen. You can zoom in, highlight, and take notes as well.
  • GPS – the maps feature can help you find your way home if you’ve gotten lost taking the scenic route. You can also share your location with friends and family.
  • Words With Friends – Scrabble for the screen. Get your friends an family on the app as well and play each other.
  • Duolingo – learn one of many languages on offer and keep your brain sharp.
  • Memory games – there are endless options here, but these can help maintain and improve cognitive function.
  • Social Media – pick your poison here, popular ones to connect with family and friends are facebook and instagram.
  • Facetime – a call feature that allows you to video chat with loved ones. Great for feeling close when you’re far away.

Medical Alert Systems

A medical alert system is often a wearable necklace or bracelet that is connected to a cellular or home line. These systems give you the ability to alert a call center, 911, or family member in the case of an emergency with the click of a button. There are many offerings of this service depending on your lifestyle and needs.

Video Games

Video games are not just stationary any more: they can get you up and moving! Nintendo Wii, Dance Dance Revolution, and Guitar Hero are some of the more popular games that actually interact with your movements in the real world. Get up and exercise, dance, play a game of golf, or play the guitar solo of a popular song and see your results on the screen.

Fitbit

A Fitbit is a bracelet that will help you stay on top of your exercise goals. Some features of these activity trackers are counting steps taken, calories burned, and sleep quality. Smartwatches also have these features if you want a watch that can do even more.

Roomba

The Roomba is a hands-free circular vacuum cleaner that cleans the floor all by itself. This is a great idea if your back gives you trouble when you bend over to do the vacuuming.

Ride-sharing

Ride-sharing apps allow you to call a ride to your exact location through it’s GPS services. It saves your payment details so there is no exchange of money at the end of the ride. You can read reviews on the drivers before you get in the car and share your moment-by-moment location with friends and family in transit. There are starting to be endless phone apps for ride-sharing, and it’s hard to know which is better. Uber and Lyft still seem to be the most popular, so it’s best to see which one has the most options in your town.

TV Ears

This technology is for seniors that have a hard time hearing the television. Think of these as personal headphones that allow you to hear the television at your own volume. You set the sound to the level that makes you comfortable without having to disrupt your family or neighbors with your television on too loud.

Nixplay

This is a digital photo frame that is connected to a smartphone app. It allows you to send photos from your phone to the frame. The frame, which you can set up anywhere in your house, rotates through the photos. You can also have friends share photos to your Nixplay device. If you aren’t savvy with smartphones, have a friend or family member set up an account on your behalf. This can be a great way for the family to send photo updates to you through a picture frame in your own home.

If reading this has inspired you to infuse a little more tech into your life, be sure you do some homework in picking out the right product and service. And if you are new to the tech world, please read through our tips to avoid senior scams. Technology is full of possibilities, and being informed helps you enjoy your tech safely.