5 Reasons Why a Senior Living Community Is Great for Introverts

As you get older and start looking at your next transition in life, a senior living community is an excellent option! However, as exciting as it may be for some, there are others who get nervous about big transitions and new experiences. Introverts struggle with moving to a new place and dealing with the anxiety of meeting new people all at once.

 

While introverts are quieter, more reserved individuals who typically don’t do well in large crowds, a senior living community is a great option for 5 main reasons!

 

Reason 1: Introverts Will Own Their Home

One of the biggest concerns for introverts moving to a new place is whether or not they will have their own space. Introverts want to have a space that is solely theirs for privacy and comfort purposes. In a PHC community, seniors can have their own homes. These homes will provide introverts with the independence they crave. 

 

Reason 2: Senior Living Communities Provide Quiet Environments for Introverts

Not only will introverts have their own spaces to rest and recharge, but we create a quiet environment. These serene locations are away from the busy life of a city and provide residents with a peaceful community.

 

Reason 3: The Community Will Become the Introvert’s Family

A great benefit to these communities are the experienced employees who know how to help seniors in every way imaginable. Because they are specially trained and experienced, there is a level of trust and companionship created within the community. Introverts need people they can trust and having a strong, stable community like this is the first step to building a family at our community.

 

Reason 4: Introverts Won’t Be Depressed in a Senior Living Community

Depression is one of the biggest risk factors for seniors. What initially starts as boredom for some seniors turns into depression.

Staying active and busy is a great way to help prevent certain types of depression. A senior living community has a ton of activities available tailored to seniors to help them enjoy their lives. Introverts can take advantage of these opportunities and prevent the risk of boredom and depression.

 

Reason 5: Introverts Can Live at Their Own Pace

Introverts can easily stress out about moving into a new place so being given the time to acclimate is important. In a senior living community, nobody is rushing you to do things or pressuring you to participate. You have the autonomy to acclimate at your own pace since you live in your own space.

 

Senior Living Communities Are a Great Place for Introverts

Senior living communities are great options for everyone because they provide excellent health services and provide seniors with opportunities to live an active and healthy life.

 

Although introverts might be a little tentative at the start, these communities are excellent places for them because it helps maintain their preferred level of socialization while being able to enjoy their alone time in their own homes.

7 Ways for Seniors to Improve Video Calls (Part 2)

In 2021, video calls are necessary for staying in touch with family and friends. That’s why it is so important that each call has the best possible quality. Following last month’s article, here are 3 more tips to improve your video calls: limit the number of people on your call, turn the volume up, and use Wi-Fi.

 

Limit the Number of People on the Call

One of the greatest difficulties with video calls is losing connection or having poor connection. This issue increases when the number of people on the call increases. If multiple people in one house are on the same call, they are each using Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi uses broadband signal—a set amount of signal sent out to the house to be used.
The more people using the Wi-Fi at the same time, the weaker the signal will be for each device since the broadband has to be split several ways. When this happens, it is very easy for calls to be dropped. The best way to improve call quality is to limit the number of devices connected to the Wi-Fi at the same time.

 

Use Wi-Fi Instead of Data

Speaking of Wi-Fi, using Wi-Fi instead of data allows for seamless streaming and service for the video calls. Data can easily go out due to location and telephone service, whereas Wi-Fi is more consistent, and should a problem occur, it is easier to fix.
If you have a limited data plan, most plans will run on slower speeds once the limit has been met. On Wi-Fi, cellular data is not used, so you do not have to worry about exceeding your data limit. The one caveat to this rule is that Wi-Fi does have limits depending on your internet provider. Before making video calls, make sure your local internet provider has a plan strong enough for video calls. The last thing you want is to make video calls and exceed your internet usage limit!

 

Turn the Volume Up

The last thing to do when speaking on a video call is to turn the volume up. Starting the call with the volume turned all the way up makes for easy listening and allows for proper adjustment afterwards.

One of the most difficult things about video calls is not being able to hear the person clearly. This problem can be solved by simply turning the volume all the way up. However, the use of volume should be adjusted to the setting and the user’s hearing ability. It would be rude and inappropriate to blast the volume when sitting in a restaurant or in the middle of a store.

 

Gone are the days of only being able to hear a loved one’s voice. In 2021, it is possible to hear and see your loved ones all the time because of technology. Technology has improved our lives in more ways than we can fathom. Let’s take advantage of these opportunities and connect with those closest to us.

7 Ways Seniors Can Improve Video Calls

One of the greatest lessons we learned from 2020 was how to use technology to our advantage. Programs like Facetime and Zoom brought families and friends close together when distance and safety inhibited gatherings. While there is nothing better than physically being next to your loved ones, technology has proven it can help strengthen relationships from afar. However, programs like Facetime and Zoom can be a bit tricky to use. In the next two posts, we will cover 7 ways to improve your special moments with family and friends via Facetime and Zoom. Here are our first four tips to improve call quality:

 

Use a computer for your Facetime and Zoom calls

One of the best ways to improve your call quality is to use a computer for your Facetime and Zoom calls. When using Facetime and Zoom on a computer, the screen will remain stationary and the speaker on the computer will be conveniently targeted towards the person. Additionally, the screen is typically bigger on a computer, so it will be easier to see the loved one with whom you are speaking—which is what these calls are all about! Click here for step-by-step instructions.

 

Turning up the brightness on your phone

Turning up the brightness on your phone and moving to a well-lit area will help you see the people with whom you are speaking. These often overlooked and underappreciated adjustments for Facetime and Zoom calls will increase the quality of your call tremendously. There is a level of trust and familiarity that comes with being able to see the person with whom you are speaking.

 

Using a stand greatly improves Facetime and Zoom calls

In the event a computer is not available, being able to properly prop up your phone or tablet will help improve your calls.Many phone cases come with built-in stands, and tablet cases can be bought where the screen cover converts to a stand. Using a stand greatly improves Facetime and Zoom calls because it stabilizes the camera and lets the user speak more comfortably.

 

Having your phone or computer approximately two feet away from your face

As people are slowly making their way back to working in the office again, properly using Facetime and Zoom on the go is a must-have skill! It is common to see people holding their phones incredibly close to their face when on a Facetime and Zoom call. However, this is not the best way to have a call! Having your phone or computer approximately two feet away from your face allows for your entire face and torso to be in the frame. Likewise, when you have several people trying to talk to another person, having the phone or tablet extended out about two feet allows for everyone to be in the frame.

 

The last thing you want to experience when calling your loved one is a shaky and dark video. These four tips will greatly improve the call quality with your loved ones when used simultaneously. Make sure your next Facetime or Zoom call is spent saying “I love you” and not “Hold on… I can’t see you!” Spend less time dealing with technology issues and more time talking with your family.

 

6 Gift Ideas For Your Parents or Grandparents

It’s that time of year again! If you’re struggling for new ideas for what to buy for grandparents or seniors in your life, here are a few fool-proof suggestions sure to please. The best part of these gifts? They are made to be shared with your loved one.

 

Books

Reading is a lifelong pastime. Books are now available in various print sizes and audiobooks or translated into multiple languages to accommodate all readers. Whether your loved one enjoys fiction, true crime, or history, there are bound to be dozens of titles to interest them. Or find an old favorite that has recently been put back into print.

Another excellent technology for readers is the rise of Kindles or e-Reading programs. While not every senior citizen is adept at technology, an e-Reader is a compact and adaptable device for those with extensive book collections looking to downsize. These devices can hold hundreds of book titles. You could even purchase one and preload it with titles they would enjoy.

 

Monthly coffee or tea subscriptions

Most adults enjoy spending their mornings with a cup of coffee or tea. There are plenty of subscriptions that specialize in delivering coffees and teas to your loved one’s mailbox every month.  Selection choices vary from international selections to specifically curated choices based on the type of subscription service.

 

Puzzles and games to share as a family

Everyone has a favorite quiet at-home pastime. Puzzles, board games, and card games have risen in popularity recently as affordable and fun family entertainment alternatives. Several favorite games for adults have released family and kid-friendly versions, which would be an excellent way for children to bond and spend time with their grandparents. Or have grandchildren pick out a puzzle for their grandparents that they can complete together, as an activity for them to do together.

 

Go digital

One of the most significant challenges seniors face as they downsize to smaller homes or into retirement communities is downsizing their belongings and treasured keepsakes. Fortunately, technology has provided nearly limitless ways for those looking to downsize without tossing our precious mementos. Digital photo albums and frames are more compact and attractive than ever. Many can hold hundreds, if not thousands, of cherished family photos while taking up a fraction of the space. Some services will help digitize and upload home videos as well.

 

Ancestry kits

One of the most popular gifts over the past few years, for all ages, has been the rise of ancestry kits. There’s a variety of services and products that specialize in helping your family discover their history. While this is an excellent gift for older family members, it is one that the entire family can benefit from and enjoy.

 

Grocery delivery subscription

If your loved one is still cooking or preparing their meals, consider a subscription to a grocery delivery service. While many retailers offer special hours for senior citizens to shop, grocery delivery removes transportation burdens. It also gives them the security of getting items delivered to their door in a safe and distanced way.

5 Socially-Distant Ways to Show Grandparents Your Thankfulness

grandparents on phone

The pandemic has temporarily changed how generations of families interact with one another. Here are a few fun ways to spend time with loved ones, while observing social distancing guidelines.

Set a routine.

Try to block off a regular check-in time every week or every few days to say hello and discuss life events. If your grandparent is not particularly tech-savvy, this can be a regular phone call, or if they are, a Zoom or FaceTime chat.

 

Mail letters.

Not all seniors are savvy when it comes to digital communications like Facetime and Zoom. Not only are letters more familiar for some, but they also give younger generations a chance to flex their writing and creativity skills. Drawings, handmade cards, and childrens’ arts and crafts projects are a wonderful thing to include if you have children who might be too small to write a letter. And if you have young children, sending and receiving mail is a fun novelty for a generation that has grown up on the internet.

 

Make a care package.

In addition to mailing letters and cards, put together a package of fun activities for grandparents. Puzzle books, crossword puzzles, card games, or books are a good start. Set up an exchange. One week you mail them a package; the next week, they send something back. And while everyone is encouraged to avoid unnecessary trips to the store, this might be an excellent time to utilize online deliveries or get creative. Putting together an album of old photos or recipe collections is a fun activity to get children involved while everyone is at home. It costs virtually nothing and has a more profound sentimental value for your loved ones.

 

It’s a date.

Set aside a time to watch a television show or movie simultaneously. This way, you will have something to talk about the next time you check-in. Perhaps start a virtual family book club if you have avid readers at home.

 

Virtual Activities

Do your grandparents have a unique skill or hobby they could teach grandchildren over a video call? Maybe your children want to give their grandparents a show-and-tell or talent show over Facetime? Some numerous hobbies and activities can be done virtually with grandparents, from teaching a hobby or skill to finishing homework or sharing a meal.

 

How To Talk To A Loved One Who Doesn’t Remember You

For adult children and loved ones, facing the changes dementia and Alzheimer’s presents can be devastating. Abrupt changes in mood, odd behavior, and the loss of precious memories can be challenging to watch. You might be unsure how to interact with your loved one. Here are some things to consider when your loved one no longer remembers who you are.

Don’t question them

Often, the first thing family members want to do when a parent or loved one cannot remember their name is to continue asking. “Do you know who I am?” “Do you remember me?”. However, repeated questioning can cause those who have dementia to become more confused or start to panic. These questions might make you, as an adult child, feel better, but they can only worsen a situation for your loved one. Their memory recall is not as fast as ours, and often in a hurry, they will answer, “I don’t know.” Another helpful tactic is to reintroduce yourself to your parent when it merely happens. “Hi, I’m John. I’m your son,” for example.

Focus on fond memories – and making new ones.

Even if your parent struggles to recall names and faces, they are still the same person they once were. It can be beneficial for everyone to spend time reminiscing about fond memories you both share. Try not to bombard them with too many specific questions and instead let them guide you through their memories. It’s essential to ask broad, leading questions that can help trigger their memories. Many people living with dementia remember their childhood and young adult lives quite vividly. It might be helpful to look at old photos or ask them about family vacations or traditions.

Stay in the moment

Spending quality time together will help your loved one with dementia feel more secure. Doing things they enjoy or that you share is a great way to strengthen your relationship and provide them with confidence and a renewed sense of self.

Practice self-care

It can be easy to get caught up with worry for your parent with dementia, but it is crucial to take the time to check in to make sure you are okay. If you aren’t looking after yourself, how can you look after someone else? It is vital to seek out professional support when you need it, from licensed professional caregivers or other adult children of people with dementia who might share your same frustrations and concerns.

Six Senior Living Myths

For many of us, our ideas about senior living are significantly outdated. Perhaps your last experience with it was visiting a relative decades ago, in a hospital-like facility that felt drab and boring. Many people believe senior living is a term interchangeable with a nursing home, that they are only for the ill and elderly who can no longer take care of themselves. However, nothing could be farther from the truth when talking about today’s modern senior communities. Residents of these communities report being overwhelmingly happy. A survey from the Assisted Living Federation of America reports that ninety-four percent of respondents say that they were satisfied with the overall quality of their community. And ninety-three percent were pleased with the level of independence gained from living in their community.

Here are a few myths about senior living that you should ignore:

1. Senior living is for the sick and elderly

Senior living communities are often grouped in with nursing homes when it comes to people’s perceptions. Nursing homes provide medical care to the elderly or seniors who are in poor health. Senior living communities are designed for active older adults. They want to spend their retirement years unburdened by home upkeep but want assistance with daily activities they might not feel comfortable completing on their own. Not only do senior living communities offer more flexibility and convenience for aging seniors, but they also allow residents to stay in control of their choices. Often, waiting for an illness or health crisis occurs to move rushes the process and might leave seniors with limited options. Most independent living communities do offer higher levels of care when the need arises, such as assisted living, memory care, skilled nursing and rehab programs that residents can take advantage of without the stress of having to move.

2. Loss of Independence

Often, the choice to live independently is mistaken for living on their own. Modern senior living facilities pride themselves on making residents feel as independent as possible. With limited care provided, seniors can feel at home and spend their days on their schedule. Residents aren’t limited to where they can go or what they can do. Most communities offer outings, activities, socializing, fitness, art classes, and flexible dining options. Participation in these activities is optional, and for those who’d prefer to spend their retirement years traveling or visiting loved ones, they can enjoy knowing their residence is being looked after while they are away. No longer burdened by home maintenance, lawn care, housekeeping or cooking, residents often find they have more time for activities and hobbies, or for spending time with loved ones. Many communities provide some type of transportation if a resident is no longer comfortable driving or keeping up with car maintenance. Some properties even offer parking and garage space for residents who do enjoy the independence of driving themselves.

3. Lack of socialization and activities

The activities offered to residents vary by community. Still, they all offer a variety of enrichment programs and wellness programs—activities such as yoga, crafting classes, sports, board games, and more. There is no limit to the opportunities for seniors to enjoy a favorite pastime, or take up a new hobby. Residents can meet new friends who share the same interests. Activities and social events are optional, with limited set schedules. Most seniors find they have more time to enjoy their favorite pastimes in a senior living community, as they are no longer spending time with home upkeep and household chores.

4. No privacy or personalization

Today’s senior living communities often resemble a resort or luxury condo. Many offer breathtaking views of cities or nature. Communities vary in size and style; some offer apartments or townhomes; others are small houses. Most offer many different floor plan options. Units can have single or double rooms, with various accommodations and amenities, such as kitchenettes and laundry. Seniors are free to furnish and decorate their space with their items. While downsizing a home can be an exhausting task, today’s senior living communities can accommodate almost all of the comforts of home without sacrificing taste or style in the process. Additionally, seniors have control over many of the security features offered in these communities, giving them a sense of privacy and security.

5. Seniors would prefer to move in with family

Seventy-three percent of families report that a senior loved one’s quality of life improved after moving to assisted living, according to research from A Place for Mom. Many seniors fear becoming a burden to family and loved ones as they age. While caregiving often strengthens relationships, it can also affect the caregiver’s ability to work, maintain relationships and health. According to the CDC, caregivers often neglect their own needs and suffer from the physical and emotional demands of caregiving. Choosing a senior living community could result in a happier and healthier life, not just for senior citizens, but also for their loved ones.

6. Senior living is expensive

The cost of senior living varies depending on the size of residence and level of care. The median monthly fee for assisted living in 2019 was $4,051, according to a Genworth study on the cost of care. While the monthly rates of senior living might surprise and intimidate some families, it is often comparable or even less than remaining in the home and receiving the same services and support.  Everything offered at a senior living community is part of the same monthly rate. Expenses like meals, transportation, activities, assistance with daily tasks, housekeeping, medication management, and medical services are all included. Not to mention the utilities, insurance, taxes, and upkeep expenses that come with homeownership.

Home Monitoring for Seniors

When we talk about home monitoring systems for senior adults, the most common image is that of the commercials with a woman falling and unable to reach her telephone. The ad goes on to taut its wearable technology as the latest development in senior care. However, today’s devices are much more discreet and tech-savvy. Gone are large, clunky wearable devices of the past. Today’s seniors rely on app-based security programs and sleek, modern cameras and motion sensors. We’ve compiled a list of the best home monitoring services and products.

Safety from home invasions and natural disasters are significant concerns for everyone but are especially concerning for aging seniors living alone. New smartphone-enabled security systems like Nest and Abode are popular with customers of all ages for their easy installation and customizable features. Both home security systems boast minimalist systems with few components to manage and troubleshoot. These devices monitor doors, windows, and motion, and trigger an alarm that can notify authorities and caregivers if there is a problem. Both systems use app-based technology to monitor regular activity and send notifications to seniors and caregivers. Notifications regarding smoke alarms, flood warnings, and temperature sensors are shared with caregivers, who can check-in via the smartphone app to make sure things like doors and windows are locked, or if an alarm was triggered by mistake.

The most popular feature of these systems is their integrations with smart devices like Amazon Alexa, or Google Assistant, which allow for voice commands and programmable automation features. Not only can both smart speakers be connected to home safety devices for more comfortable use, but they have also shown to be highly beneficial in assisting seniors living alone. These devices work as a smart home hub that connects to lights, power switches, and other gadgets allowing seniors to control their homes with voice. These assistive devices can also be programmed to call loved ones and set reminders for important tasks, like changing the batteries in a smoke detector, or reminding one to turn the oven off. Voice-activated technology has shown to eliminate the learning curve with technology that can be a barrier for seniors.

One device that deploys similar technology to Alexa and Google Assistant, but with aging seniors as their primary focus is TruSense. This network of home-connected devices integrates with other smart home devices. It includes a motion sensor, contact sensor, and smart outlets that work together to provide up-to-date data for caregivers. TruSense also provides caregivers with probable fall alerts and notifications for when a loved one leaves home.

A recognizable name that has recently come up in senior care is Best Buy for its newly launched Assured Living service. The goal of Assured Living is to give adult children and caregivers peace of mind when living apart from aging parents, by using non-invasive sensors and notifications for activities like movement and sleep patterns. The service also provides aging seniors with the latest in smart home technology, such as voice commands for lights and thermostat controls. Aging parents and caregivers can track the data from the sensors via an online portal or mobile app, or can sign up for notifications via text or email. These sensors learn the habits and routines of seniors over time to notify loved ones when common patterns are disrupted. In addition to safety and emergencies, the sensors can also show whether a loved one has opened a medicine cabinet or refrigerator. The device can also monitor sleep quality and activity levels.

When it comes to independence and home safety, today’s seniors have several high tech and easy to operate services and devices to choose from, regardless of their personal needs.

At Northridge Village, we provide emergency pendant systems that allow residents to click a button for help, and all exterior doors are monitored and alarmed. If you have questions about our building security, please give us a call!

How to Start the Conversation

A helpful guide for navigating a tricky conversation around senior living

There are a handful of conversations we have at different phases of life that carry a stigma. Talking to an aged parent(s) about moving to a nursing home is definitely on that list. The fear of this conversation is understandable and may be keeping you from striking it up. But it is in everyone’s best interest to have the conversation, and have it with care. Here’s a guide of things to consider that may make this conversation much easier to approach.

 

Start the conversation early

Start it too early. Start it when it feels like it’s relevance is way down the line. This offers an opportunity to have the seed planted long before there is any threat of eventuality raising the emotion of the conversation. Find out what is important to them as a couple, as individuals, and for their family. This way, your parent(s) has the chance to freely share their wishes and you can be armed with that information when the right time comes.

Maybe they already have a specific location in mind! Inquire about waiting lists long before you need them so you’re not in the position of choosing a place based on availability when crisis strikes.

 

Assess the right time

At some point, the conversation about moving to assisted living becomes a necessity. This looks different for every family, but hopefully you’re able to make this decision a priority before there is a disaster at home.

One great way to identify the right time is to volunteer to come around the house for a project, something extensive like landscaping or cleaning the house, so you can see their range of motion and the state of the household. It will give you an idea of how your parents are faring with the upkeep of their residence while also laying a foundation of good will and trust that could be the opening for a future conversation.

 

Do your research

Having information prepared always makes a hard conversation less challenging. Hopefully you know your parents’ wishes, but even if you weren’t able to start the conversation early, you know your parents.

Do they want to be closer to family? Do they care about having access to a kitchen to make family favorites? Do they want to live in assisted or independent living? What is the future of their illness? Do they have a pet or furniture they want to bring along?

These are concerns they will raise when the conversation comes, so knowing what their options are that address these needs can be a real lifesaver when presenting the option of aged care.

 

Consider your language

Often times, family dynamics can be the hardest part of a conversation like this. Even your own assumption that this conversation will be hard can make the conversation hard. Enter into the conversation in a positive and helpful way. Ask questions about how your parent is doing. Present your concerns directly, but also offer a balanced amount of optimism about the benefits of the communities they might consider. Use your knowledge of what matters to them to frame these benefits.

This conversation could bring up a lot of feelings for your parent. Be sure to acknowledge whatever your parent communicates to you, whether positive or negative. People want to be heard, and not only will affirming their concerns let them know you understand them but it will also give you insight into what may be holding them back so you can help them overcome their objections.

And, perhaps most importantly, take it slow. You don’t have to make a decision in a day. This is a huge life change for you parent. Let it simmer for a bit to give them time to adjust.

 

Personalize it

Mention how much your friend’s mom loves the social aspect of her new home, or how you ran into the son of your parent’s old colleague who says his dad couldn’t be more thrilled about being off the hook for yard work.

If they don’t buy the anecdotes, take your parent to check out places out together! Sometimes seeing a senior community in person can dispel an unsavory preconception. Especially if you can take them somewhere where they already have friends! Seeing the a place up close can help your parents actually envision themselves there.

 

It’s their decision

As long as it is safely possible, this needs to be their decision and they need to know that you know that. If they’re not ready right away, offer other solutions that bridge the gap and buy them the time they need to adjust on their own. Gift them a cleaning service, update some safety features of their home, or organize home care.

Not forcing the issue and letting your parent decide will make you a safe sounding board for your parent as they processes this idea, but also will make their adjustment when they finally decide to move much smoother and happier.

You may be surprised to find out your parent is more amenable than you imagined, and giving them their own space to decide what their life will look like will make them feel even better about their decision to move forward into this next phase.

 

Bring in help

If it is getting dangerous at home and you aren’t making any headway, consider bringing in a friend, spiritual leader, or another trusted person to help have the conversation. The truth is, no matter how well intentioned, the adult children of aging parents aren’t always the best person for this conversation. Your road block isn’t the end of the road, often a third party can pave the way when you thought the conversation was going nowhere. Don’t take this personally, let the help you’ve enlisted move the conversation forward and you can focus on being a support system and maintaining your relationship with your family.

 

The Best Podcasts for Seniors

While they have been around for several years, podcasts have recently become an overwhelmingly popular form of entertainment and information. According to The Podcast Consumer 2018 from Edison Research, 34% of 18- to 34-year-olds, and 36% of 35- to 54-year-olds are monthly listeners. Seniors 55-plus make up 19% of current listeners. A podcast is an online show, structured similarly to radio shows seniors might have grown up enjoying. Like radio, they are entirely audio – no video. They are available on the internet to download for free onto a smartphone or a computer using your web browser. They vary in length, with most running between 30 minutes and one hour. Podcasts cover a wide variety of topics; there is a show dedicated to almost any interest and demographic. Below are a few we recommend for seniors.

 

Freakonomics

Each week, Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books, speaks with Nobel laureates, entrepreneurs, intellectuals, and others about socioeconomic issues for a general audience. With over 8 million downloads per month, it is one of the most popular podcasts on Apple Podcast. Topics range from tipping customs to Chinese folklore, to exercise, and in-home DNA testing kits. This podcast, like many others, doesn’t have a chronological order, so feel free to skip around, or pick a topic that interests you and enjoy.

 

This American Life

This American Life is a weekly public radio show hosted by Ira Glass. Heard by 2.2 million people, with another 2.5 million people downloading it weekly. The show primarily focuses on journalistic nonfiction and essays, with each episode following a theme. Through interviews and first-person narratives, the diverse topics cover a broad span of moods and tone. The wide variety of these stories will entertain seniors, and inspire them to share them with others, as many reviewers of the podcast have done. In addition to sharing stories, the show also covers current events and how those events affect real people.

 

Criminal

Criminal is a podcast about true crime and the people behind the cases. Every story is real. The interviewees are directly involved with the crime in some way or another. Stories of people on both sides of the law. Stories of people caught in the middle and the ones who solve the cases. What’s it like to make counterfeit money? Have you ever had your identity stolen? Who cleans up crime scenes? Each episode is a standalone story, so feel free to skip around and listen to the titles that catch your eye.

 

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Produced by the team at HowStuffWorks, this podcast is ideal for seniors with a keen interest in history. Skipping over well-known events of the past, Stuff You Learned in History class takes a deep dive into the stories left out of the history books. Highlighting social and cultural happenings and highlighting forgotten historical figures around the world, the podcast provides insight into moments of history long forgotten. Because the podcast covers so many historical topics, you can listen by theme or period of time.

 

The Alton Browncast

Food Network’s Alton Brown chats with a wide array of food industry professionals. Featuring chefs and bartenders, authors, scientists, and everyone in-between, Alton Brown talks about food and how we eat throughout the podcast. It’s perfect for the senior interested in cooking and dining.

 

Better Health While Aging

Hosted by practicing geriatrics specialist, Leslie Kernisan, MD MPH, this is a podcast for older adults and family caregivers alike. Dr. Kernisan and her guests discuss common health problems that affect seniors, and what works for improving health and wellness while aging. She and her guests also address common concerns and dilemmas that come with caring for aging parents. Medication safety, memory and cognitive health, and managing cardiovascular risks are just a few of the topics covered in this highly informational podcast.

 

You Must Remember This

You Must Remember This is a critically acclaimed podcast exploring the forgotten histories of Hollywood’s first century. Proclaimed as the best podcast of 2018 by Entertainment Weekly, the show is written and narrated by former film critic Karina Longworth; it is the ideal show for any senior interested in the golden age of cinema. A heavily-researched work of creative nonfiction, Karina sorts out what happened behind the scenes of the films, stars, and scandals of the 20th century.

 

If any of these shows appeal to you or someone you might know, or you want to go searching on your own, there are several options for accessing podcasts. If you have a smartphone, there are apps to help you listen and keep you updated on shows you enjoy. If you have an iPhone, there is a podcast app pre-installed. You can also download other apps for listening, like Stitcher. The Google Play Music and Spotify apps are great options for those who want to transition between music and shows.

 

One last great feature of podcasts is that they can be stopped and started and returned to at a later time. This feature makes them ideal for seniors who enjoy a busy lifestyle or want to enjoy their favorite shows with family and friends.